Adventures In Cello Shopping

I recently had the daunting experience of having to buy another cello.  The one that I’d been playing on since 9th grade suffered a fatal sound post crack last year, and unfortunately had to be retired.  My old cello held such sentimental value for me since my parents went through a lot to get it for me. They wanted me to have a nice instrument to play on when my high school symphonic orchestra took a trip to New York City to perform at Carnegie Hall.

Before deciding to buy a new cello, I first had to determine if it was worth it to get my sound post crack fixed. I took it over to a popular luthier in town named Stephanie Voss to get an assessment. Her assistant informed

Circular dowel in the neck block.

me that since the after rehab value of my cello would be approximately $6,000, it wasn’t going to be worth it to spend thousands of dollars to get the crack properly repaired. Especially, since one of the prior owners of my cello had a dowel nailed into the neck block as a part of a previous repair, which threw a few things out of sorts. For example, since the neck block couldn’t be adjusted due to the dowel locking it into place, my strings were always too high off the fingerboard in thumb position the closer that I got towards the bridge. Stephanie could only shave my bridge down but so far because then that would cause my strings to lay flat against my fingerboard in first position. That issue alone would have had a negative impact on the resale value if the sound post crack hadn’t already devalued it to something close to scrap wood.

With all of the additional challenges that my cello was facing, we all came to the conclusion that it would be best for me to invest in a new cello. This is when I had to get some help from an excellent cellist with the Atlanta Symphony who was coaching me at the time. She referred me to her friends at the Ronald Sachs Violin Shop who gently held my hands through this difficult process. Since my price range was on the lower end of the spectrum, and I still wanted to have a high end concert cello sound on a tight budget, they directed me to the Jay Haide and Frank Ivantie models. The Violin Shop was gracious enough to loan me two cellos for almost a month so that I could try them out at home and use one of them for a solo performance that I was scheduled to give at the Atlanta Southwest Fine Arts Center.

I finally decided on one of the Frank Ivantie models. This was the same cello that my coach from the Atlanta Symphony had used for some of her Symphony concerts as a temporary replacement while her expensive, antique cello was being worked on in New York. I figured that I couldn’t go wrong with that choice since it had already held its own at the highest levels of performance.

What I learned from this cello shopping experience is that, as in life, we all need the help of our friends sometimes to make it through the situations that get thrown our way. I’m glad that I had my coach, Dona Vellek, to lean on for guidance and solid advice. She helped me to find an excellent cello at a reasonable price with a few other perks thrown in since I was using professionals in her network. Hopefully, you will find some gems in this article that will be beneficial to you when it’s time to purchase your next instrument.

 

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